source: sandandglass

In San Francisco last year, a man stabbed a woman in the face and arm after she didn’t respond positively to his sexually harassing her on the street.

In Bradenton, Fla., a man shot a high school senior to death after she and her friends refused to perform oral sex at his request.

In Chicago, a scared 15-year-old was hit by a car and died after she tried escaping from harassers on a bus.

Again, in Chicago, a man grabbed a 19-year-old walking on a public thoroughfare, pulled her onto a gangway and assaulted her.

In Savannah, Georgia, a woman was walking alone at night and three men approached her. She ignored them, but they pushed her to the ground and sexually assaulted her.

In Manhattan, a 29-year-old pregnant woman was killed when men catcalling from a van drove onto the sidewalk and hit her and her friend.

Last week, a runner in California — a woman — was stopped and asked, by a strange man in a car, if she wanted a ride. When she declined he ran her over twice.

And, lest we forget, we’re one big happy planet family here and this exact same dynamic happens the world over in varying degrees and to varying effect. Women operating freely and independently in public is a relatively recent historical development, a shift in social order. Street harassment acts like a thermidor.

What happened to this girl in Florida should make everyone pause. If he did what he’d done in India, people here might be inclined to say, “What a horrible place that is for women.” (Which is true.) Instead, what we say is, “He’s a lunatic,” or, better still, “What was she doing for him to think he could stop and offer her money for sex?” While this man is dangerous, he’s probably not mentally ill. If he is, then so are the millions of other men that feel entitled to assault and brutalize children and women and “othered” people every day.

For women and LGTB people, especially when you consider race and class as legitimate factors in this equation, that risk is significantly higher than it is for most straight men all too comfortable discussing this subject in mocking terms.

Street Harassment: Is a Man Running Over a 14-Year Old Girl for Refusing Sex Serious Enough? | Soraya Chemaly (via christinefriar)

(Source: brutereason, via christinefriar)

source: brutereason

burningonyx:

zerostatereflex:

Fertilization

A beautifully done animation on how you became you.

See the full video here as I left out some really cool parts.

From 300 or so million down to ONE.

YOU. MADE. IT.

Some people make me say, “Out of 300 million sperm, YOURS was the one that made it?” o_O

(via subatomiconsciousness)

source: zerostatereflex

completely-dunn:

wifipassworcl:

thepottertardis:

apertures413thdoctor:

pleatedjeans:

via

Ellen what the fuck happened in 1998

ellen degeneres came out in 1997

yeah but ellen what happened in 2014

ellen page came out in 2014

(via gayheathen)

source: pleatedjeans

pennyfornasa:

Last week’s episode of COSMOS, entitled "A Light in The Darkness," portrayed the topics of illumination and optics through the stories of famed scientists. COSMOS, which has been critically acclaimed during its first five episodes, makes it clear that the openness of scientific knowledge is vital towards the advancement of our collective understanding of nature.

Neil deGrasse Tyson narrated the story of Joseph Fraunhofer (1787–1826), an abused orphan-turned-scientist whose discoveries are ultimately responsible for the basis of astrophysics — Tyson’s occupation. Fraunhofer, a German optician, is credited for the discovery of the dark absorption lines found in light spectrums.

If you have yet to hear Fraunhofer’s story, it can be viewed on Hulu.

Watch COSMOS: “A Light in The Darkness” here:
http://bit.ly/COSMOS-Ep5

(via thenewenlightenmentage)

source: pennyfornasa

Neil DeGrasse Tyson Said What He Thinks About Race Now That He's Made It, And Almost Nobody Noticed

kenobi-wan-obi:

dynastylnoire:

He goes in

I really want this whole thing in transcript or quoted, it’s perfect.

So much respect for NdGT

(Source: jessehimself)

source: jessehimself
hyperdrivemechanic:


Neil Degrasse Tyson - Cosmos

hyperdrivemechanic:

Neil Degrasse Tyson - Cosmos

(via subatomiconsciousness)

crokel:

real women have curves. real women have one single, continuous, infinite curve. real women are a hollow sphere of mass 1kg, suspended in a void. calculate real women’s acceleration if real women is struck by an object accelerating east at 5m/s/s.

(Source: duane-barry, via subatomiconsciousness)

source: duane-barry

http://kenobi-wan-obi.tumblr.com/post/83058075939/theres-a-reason-why-neil-degrasse-tysons-views

kenobi-wan-obi:

There’s a reason why Neil deGrasse Tyson’s views on race are completely overlooked and why even I was never aware of them until recently. Science nerds will make a billion photosets and quotes about the new Cosmos and speak on everything Neil gets into even the science of the fucking Mjölnir…

source: kenobi-wan-obi

joshbyard:

Google X Lab Files Patent for Contact Lens With Built-In Camera

Google has invented a new smart contact lens with an integrated camera. The camera would be very small and sit near the edge of the contact lens so that it doesn’t obscure your vision. By virtue of being part of the contact lens, the camera would naturally follow your gaze, allowing for a huge range of awesome applications, from the basis of a bionic eye system for blind and visually impaired people, through to early warning systems (the camera spots a hazard before your brain does), facial recognition, and superhuman powers (telescopic and infrared/night vision). 

(via Google invents smart contact lens with built-in camera: Superhuman Terminator-like vision here we come | ExtremeTech)

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

source: joshbyard

becausejensenackles:

I feel like I should have seen that coming.

(Source: nevver, via sauve-moi)

source: nevver

anarcho-queer:

DEA Agent Was Told Not To Enforce Drug Laws In White Areas (Must Watch)

Don’t believe there’s a racial element to the War on Drugs? As a former U.S. marshal and special agent for the Drug Enforcement Agency, Matthew Fog witnessed the astonishing inequity of the War on Drugs firsthand. This is his story.

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

source: anarcho-queer
rjmckinnon:

frostedsammy:

i don’t normally post porn sorry 

I do, and this is much better.

rjmckinnon:

frostedsammy:

i don’t normally post porn sorry 

I do, and this is much better.

(Source: tinsoftware, via makehappinessalifestyle)

source: tinsoftware